More News

Written using Thomas own experience of depression and her desire to talk more about suicide and mental health in society today, Dust is very much about life, about those who remain behind after a suicide

Following award-winning, sell-out runs at Edinburgh Fringe 2017 and Soho Theatre, Dust by Milly Thomas (Clique, BBC3; Clickbait and A First World Problem, Theatre503), directed by Sara Joyce (The Scar Test, Soho Theatre; Act Without Words I, Rough For Theatre II, Old Red Lion Theatre; Director with Old Vic 12), now transfers to the West End s Trafalgar Studios.  Dust is a refreshing, caustic and comedic treatment of one woman s depression and suicide.

Written using Thomas own experience of depression and her desire to talk more about suicide and mental health in society today, Dust is very much about life, about those who remain behind after a suicide, and how squeamish we are around death.  As Alice is forced to watch the aftermath of her suicide and its ripple effect on her family and friends, she quickly learns that death changes people and that death is not the change she hoped for.  

Milly Thomas comments, I am utterly thrilled that Dust is back again for more and I am beyond excited for it to transfer to Trafalgar Studios. Knowing that I’ll be back in the bodysuit soon has filled me with joy and I can’t wait to share Dust and Alice’s story with a whole new audience and take our journey further. 

Milly Thomas

Milly Thomas is a London-based writer and actor, whose acting credits include The Feed (Amazon); Enterprice (BBC3); Quacks (BBC2); Cargo (The Arcola Theatre); Dry Land (Jermyn Street Theatre); and Downton Abbey (ITV).

She began writing when she graduated in 2014 from the BA Acting at The Royal Central School of Speech and Drama. Milly s first full length play A First World Problem opened at Theatre503 in July 2014 to critical acclaim. She was then commissioned by The Royal Central School of Speech and Drama to write Piggies in 2015. Her play Clickbait opened the 2016 spring season at Theatre503 and played to sold-out audiences and an extended run.

Her play Brutal Cessation ran alongside Dust during the Edinburgh Fringe 2017. She is a member of both the Young Writers Lab 2015 and Writer s Lab Alumni 2017 at Soho Theatre. She has taken part in The Royal Court Writers Group 2016 led by playwright Stef Smith and Headstart – a group comprising of ten playwrights assembled by Headlong Theatre Company and Blacklisted Films.

Milly has taken part in writers rooms for Pure Grass Films, Balloon Entertainment, Brown Eyed Boy and has recently completed the 2016 Channel 4 Screenwriting Course. She has written episodes of River City for BBC Scotland and Clique for BBC3. She is currently under commission from HighTide Theatre company.

Dust by Milly Thomas
Trafalgar Studios 2, 14 Whitehall, Westminster, London SW1A 2DY

 Tuesday 4th September – Saturday 13th October 2018

Pumeza Matshikiza brings her exquisite lyric voice and emotional sensitivity to bear on Schumann’s vividly emotional Frauenliebe und leben, together with Strauss’s sublimely beautiful Four Last Songs.

“I think I’ve found the new Maria Callas . . . What initially arrested me, and went on fascinating me, was not only the beauty of her singing, one of the loveliest lightish lyric sopranos I have heard in the flesh, but also her commitment to the role she was performing.” The Spectator

31st October Howard Assembly Room

Described as “one of today’s most exciting new operatic voices” (Independent), South African soprano Pumeza Matshikiza is one of today’s rising opera stars. An exclusive Decca Classics recording artist, her debut album “Voice of Hope” was released in 2014. Her second album “Arias” with arias by Puccini, Catalani, Ravel and Mozart and songs by Fauré was released in May 2016.

Pumeza Matshikiza kicked off the 17/18 season with recitals in Rio de Janeiro  returning to Europe to debut at the Staatstheater Wiesbaden as Mimì in Puccini’s La Bohème under the baton of Albert Horne. On the concert stage the South African soprano can be heard in solo concerts with the Württembergische Philharmonie Reutlingen under the baton of Johannes Klumpp and in a recital in Strasbourg at the Opéra national du Rhin, accompanied by her frequent musical partner, pianist Paul Montag, performing arias and South African songs.

Pumeza Matshikiza studied at the University of Cape Town College of Music and the Royal College of Music with a full scholarship. Roles at the RCM included Marenka (The Bartered Bride), Fiordiligi (Così fan tutte), Rosalinde (Die Fledermaus), Concepcion (L’heure espagnole), Poppea (L’incoronazione di Poppea) and Contessa (Le nozze di Figaro). The young soprano also participated in masterclasses with renowned artists such as Dame Kiri Te Kanawa, Sir Thomas Allen, Renata Scotto, Joan Rogers, Paul Farrington, Philip Langridge and Ileana Cotrubas. She has worked with accompanists Malcolm Martineau, Julius Drake and Simon Lepper.

Pumeza Matshikiza was a member of the Jette Parker Young Artists’ Programme at the Royal Opera House from 2007-2009 and could be heard as Blumenmädchen in Wagner’s Parsifal, Slave in Strauss’ Salome, Innocent (The Minotaur), Witch in Dido and Aeneas, Sandmann (Hänsel und Gretel) and Tebaldo in Verdi’s Don Carlo, conducted by Antonio Pappano. In January, 2010 Pumeza Matshikiza was awarded with the 1stPrize in the Veronica Dunne International Singing Competition and became an Associate Artist of the Classical Opera Company, singing the title role in Mozart’s Zaide for which she was awarded with the Patrick Fyffe-Dame Hilda Brackett Prize.

Shakespeare's Globe announces Winter Season for 2018/19 in the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse

Shakespeare’s Globe is delighted to announce its Winter Season for 2018/19 in the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse. Featuring two pairings of plays by William Shakespeare and his celebrated counterpart, Christopher Marlowe, this call and response season opens on 7 November 2018. Throughout the season we are also inviting today’s artists to examine, rework and elaborate on these 400-year-old provocations with new work written in response to Shakespeare and Marlowe.

William Shakespeare’s Macbeth will be directed by Robert Hastie, opening the season as a timely reminder of the destruction that can result from the quest for power, and an examination of the evil forces that can take root in the imagination of a tyrant. Robert is the Artistic Director of Sheffield Theatres, where he has directed their critically acclaimed productions Julius CaesarOf Kith and Kinand The Wizard of Oz. Robert directed Michelle Terry in the titular role of Henry V at Regent’s Park Open Air Theatre (2016). He also directed Breaking the Code at Manchester’s Royal Exchange in the play’s first major revival for 30 years.

Opening on 1 December, Christopher Marlowe’s Doctor Faustus will be directed by Paulette Randall, and plays alongside Macbeth. The cautionary tale examines the very nature of human curiosity and our unparalleled thirst for knowledge. Paulette’s theatre credits include Fences starring Lenny Henry (Theatre Royal Bath, West End), Gem of the OceanBlues for Mr Charlie (Tricycle) and Frankie and Johnny in the Clair de Lune (Chichester Festival Theatre). Her screen credits include CasualtyThe Crouches and Holby City (BBC One). Paulette was associate director of the 2012 Olympics Opening Ceremony and was awarded an MBE for services to drama in 2015.

Dark Night of the Soul: a feminine response to the Faustian bargain opens on 29 December. The Faustian myth continues to fascinate and intrigue, but has been appropriated by the man, the male, the masculine, with little exploration or discovery of what it means for the woman, the female, the feminine, to stop at a crossroads and ‘sell her soul’. Jude Christian will direct an ensemble of female writers including Lily Bevan, Athena Stevens, Katie Hims, Amanda Wilkin, Lisa Hammond andRachael Spence. They will respond to the provocation, with the ultimate aim of creating a chorus of female voices asking: What would you sell your soul for? Jude Christian will be performing Nanjing, a piece about identity, dispossession, and the consequences of war, in the Playhouse this week as part of Refugee Week 2018.

Ralegh: The Treason Trial, edited and dramatised by Oliver Chris, will premiere in Winchester Great Hall, the location of the original trial 415 years ago, before playing in the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse. The production is a  verbatim account of what played out on that extraordinary November morning, compiled and edited from sources present at the trial itself. Oliver is an actor, writer and director best-known in the theatre for his roles in One Man, Two Guvnors (National Theatre, West End, Broadway), King Charles III (Almeida, West End, Broadway), and Twelfth Night (National Theatre). 

Content by Shakespeare's Globe Press office

The season continues with Marlowe’s Edward II and Shakespeare’s Richard II, examining ancestral relationships and notions of identity, sexuality, desire and power. Edward II plays from 7 February 2019. King Edward recalls his lover from banishment and sets in motion a chain of events that culminate in some of the most shocking scenes in early modern theatre. Marlowe’s portrayal of Edward and Gaveston is a rare depiction of a gay relationship on the early modern stage, and a frank exploration of the tension between private pleasures and public duty.

Richard II was hugely controversial when it was first written and performed, and it strikes us today with remarkable immediacy as Shakespeare asks us to consider the destiny that we might be shaping for our ‘scepter’d isle’. The production will open on 22 February and play during a period in which we will play our own part in defining history and becoming the shoulders on which future generations will stand, as the UK’s scheduled departure from the EU is due to take place on 29 March 2019.

The Read Not Dead series continues to shed new light on Shakespeare’s contemporaries, and this year includes Edward I (first printed 1593) by George Peele. The series will also bring to life The Little French Lawyer (first performed 1619 – 1623, first published 1647) by John Fletcher and Philip Massinger, and The Tragedy of Sir John van Olden Barnavelt (first performed 1619, first published 1883) by John Fletcher and Philip Massinger. Events will be taking place over the half term period, including storytelling and workshops of Macbeth and Henry V for families.

Opening 21 March, After Edward is written by Tom Stuart. Edward II wanders on to the empty stage, bloodied and confused. He has no idea where he is, or how he got here, but he does have an ominous feeling that something is wrong. A daring new play written specifically for the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse in response to Christopher Marlowe’s Edward II, After Edward welcomes us into a chaotic world of pride and shame. Tom has appeared as an actor at Shakespeare’s Globe in many productions including The Broken Heart, The Changeling (2015), Romeo & Juliet (2009) and Much Ado About Nothing (2007).

He performed in the Battersea Arts Centre’s production of Edward IIin 2008. His screen credits include Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, Psychobitches (Sky Arts), and A Good Year. Tom has been working in film, television and theatre as an actor for 14 years. His first play I Am Not Myself These Days, an adaptation of Josh Kilmer-Purcell’s New York Times bestselling autobiography, was performed by Tom at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival (2015) and toured the UK in 2016.

Playing Shakespeare with Deutsche Bank celebrates its 14th year at the Globe Theatre. Throughout March 2019, Romeo & Juliet will be opening the doors to the next generation of audiences.

The King’s Head Theatre today announces the full line-up for its 2018 Queer Season.

Wednesday 25 July – Saturday 1 September

King’s Head Theatre, 115 Upper Street, London N1 1QN

Established in 2015, the Queer Season is a celebration of the most interesting and innovative LGBTQI+ theatre being created in modern Britain, with transfers to and from some of the UK’s largest arts festivals alongside world premieres.

The European premiere of For Reasons That Remain Unclear… by the author of the groundbreaking gay comedy-drama, The Boys in the Band, is to headline the season. Directed by Jessica Lazar (East, Life According to Saki), the play is a thrilling twohander that examines complex questions of power and fidelity. Other highlights include Tennessee Williams’ And Tell Sad Stories of the Deaths of Queens, a fascinating and touching play about the life of a New Orleans drag queen, never performed in Williams’ lifetime because of its openly gay characters; Alexis Gregory’s verbatim exploration of the lives of three prominent Queer activists, directed by Rikki Beadle-Blair; a queer murder mystery, The Cluedo Club Killings, which transfers after an acclaimed sell-out run at the Arcola Theatre and the Minerva Collective’s Sacrament, which explores the challenges of a coming out as a lesbian in Catholic Ireland.

The King’s Head Theatre’s Artistic Director, Adam Spreadbury-Maher, says ‘Queer work is a vital aspect of our programme; we’re committed to being a space where queer lives are explored, and queer artists have a voice. I’m delighted to host this season of fantastic theatre, which places work by celebrated playwrights and directors such as Mart Crowley, Tennessee Williams and Rikki Beadle-Blair alongside exciting, emerging writers and to celebrate the range of contexts, experiences and stories that the queer world has to offer.’ 

The King’s Head Theatre was established in 1970. Passionate about championing ethically produced fringe theatre, we are known for our challenging work and support of young artists. Last year 116,151 audience members saw a show of ours: 44,607 at our 110-seater home on Upper Street and 71,544 elsewhere. At our home in Islington we had 774 performances last year of 95 different shows. We are committed to fighting prejudice through the work we stage, the artists and staff we work with and by producing work for minority audience groups. We believe in fair pay for all on the fringe and create accessible routes for early career artists to stage their work; work we are passionate about. Last year we announced the theatre is on the move. Subject to a fundraising campaign, the King’s Head Theatre will move into a custom-built space in the heart of Islington Square, directly behind its current home securing the future of the venue for generations to come. 

Follow Concert News Online on...

Concert News Online provides information about performing arts throughout the UK including music, opera, dance, theatre and visual arts events with direct links to relevant booking sites and venues*. The Concert News Online home page is updated weekly with featured articles and sponsored press items supplied by the performers or their agents.
*All information, images and  content supplied by promoters or their agencies are correct at the time of publication and displayed as provided.  Concert News Online accepts no responsibility for changes to offers, the distribution of tickets or their availability.  Please note that unless specific images were provided by agents or venues these have been substituted with ‘generic’ photography courtesy of sutterstock.com, all rights reserved.

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close